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http://zgm.mn/post/2717/

Construction of Tavantolgoi power plant to begin in 2020

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http://zgm.mn/post/2717/


The Government of Mongolia and Oyu Tolgoi (OT) LLC have signed “Energy Regulatory Coordination” on 31 December 2018. According to the agreement, the construction of the Tavan Tolgoi power plant will start from March 2020 and be completed by 2023.

When the Tavan Tolgoi power plant with a capacity of 300 mWh commences, the power supply of OT will be improved along with the integrated power supply system of Mongolia. As of 2018, the OT mine project has paid approximately USD 150 million for generating electricity from Inner Mongolia's energy system annually. Tavan Tolgoi thermal power station will keep the invest in Mongolia. Furthermore, when the OT underground mine is commissioned, energy consumption will increase by 30-40 percent from current levels.

The plant will provide water from the Naiman valley and will use minimize water consumption via using an air cooling system for power plants. The Tavan Tolgoi power plant planned to use 1.2 million tons of coal annually and will use the thermal coal, which does not be exported and left at the  mines. The remaining coal will be in circulation in the economy, according to the spokesman.

Also, 200 permanent jobs will be created, following the increased housing and social buildings and improved urban development.

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Coal export reaches 76 percent of target

Mongolia exported a total of 32.3 million tons of coal earning USD 2.75 billion in the first ten months of 2019

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Mongolia exported a total of 32.3 million tons of coal earning USD 2.75 billion in the first ten months of 2019, which is only equal to 76 percent of the 2019 export target of 42 million tons, according to the General Customs Administration of Mongolia. The coal export in the third quarter rose 1.4 tons or USD 309.2 million compared to the same period of the previous year. Mongolia exported 98.2 percent of the total coal to its southern neighbor. The country’s coal export remained less than 80 percent behind plan. In other words, Mongolia needs to export 9.7 tons of coal to meet the target plan. According to the Bloomberg report, China’s coal import is expected to stand between 200-300 million tons, posing risk to the coal export of its neighbor.In the same period of 2018, the average border price of coal stood at USD 78.8 per ton and increased to USD 85.0 this year.

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Job availability expectationdecreases among consumers

Consumers’ expectation of Mongolia’s economic situation in the next six months has deteriorated

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Current Situation Index (CSI) was the main driver of this growth. In particular, the CSI has increased by 7.3 percentage points to 60.7. However, the Expectation Index has decreased slightly by 1.8 percentage points and reached 98.7.

Consumers’ expectation of Mon­golia’s economic situation in the next six months has deteriorated, even though the current situation index has improved significantly. Consumers are less optimistic about job availability and income from a year earlier, decreasing the expectation index. In the third quarter of 2019, the Consumer Confidence Index (CCI) in Mongolia is 83.5 at a similar level compared to the same period in the previous year. It has increased only by 1.8 percentage points. A significant increase in the Current Situation Index (CSI) was the main driver of this growth. In particular, the CSI has increased by 7.3 percentage points to 60.7. However, the Expectation Index has decreased slightly by 1.8 per­centage points and reached 98.7.CCI in Ulaanbaatar was 94.1 in the reporting period while CSI reached 68.1, and Expectation In­dex stood at 111.5. Consumers in rural areas are less optimistic than in Ulaanbaatar with average CCI of 77.1. CCI survey collects data on con­sumers’ expectation price levels. In the third quarter of 2019, 61 per­cent of individuals have the ex­pectation of an “increase in price level” in the next six months and this response is lower by 11 per­cent compared to 2018. A quarter of consumers expects “no change in price level” in half a year. In the next year, consumers are expecting the annual inflation rate to be around 6 percent and the exchange rate of USD to be around MNT 2,706.

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Karin Hulshof: Need to stop burning coal indoors is URGENT

The government could consider introducing a sugar tax. This would help raise revenues to invest in healthy foods for all children

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UNICEF INSTALLED MECHANICAL VENTILATION AND AIR PURIFICATION AND GIZ IMPROVED THE INSULATION OF THE BUILDING OF KINDERGARTEN #63 IN BAYANZURKH DISTRICT, FINANCIALLY SUPPORTED BY THE SWISS AGENCY FOR DEVELOPMENT AND COOPERATION (SDC). THIS KINDERGARTEN IS NOW MORE ENERGY EFFICIENT AND HAS CLEANER AIR INSIDE, PROTECTING CHILDREN FROM AIR POLLUTION. THIS SHOULD BECOME STANDARD PRACTICE IN ALL KINDERGARTENS AND UNICEF WILL CONTINUE TO ADVOCATE FOR THIS.

AScience and policy dialogue on combat-ing urban air pollution impacts on maternal and child health in Asia took place in Ulaanbaatar at the start of the so called “smoke season”. This is when the amount of pollutants in Ulaanbaatar’s air reaches it annual peak. ZGM Daily had the chance to sit down with Ms.Karin Hulshof, UNICEF Rуgional Director for East Asia and the Pacific to discuss out-comes of the dialogue and ways Mongolia can utilise to better its air quality.

-Моngolia has made some pro-gress in reducing air pollution, fol-lowing the government’s decision to ban raw coal this year. What’s your verdict on the government’s policies on air pollution reduction?

-In terms of reducing PM2.5 levels, I think we need a few more months data. So far the winter has been mild. We should also keep in mind that even if it would result in a 50% improvement, it would still leave us with very toxic levels of pollution affecting our health. To provide clean air to its citizens, the government has to rapidly and com­pletely phase out the burning of any type of coal and other solid fuels in residential areas. I like to quote the UN Secretary General Antonio Gu-terres who said that Asia’s “coal addiction” should end. This will require expanding district heating and strengthening the electric grid, much better insulation, and proper pricing of energy. Especially insu­lation of people’s homes has been neglected far too long. I really hope the government will come up with a very ambitious plan and deliver the result within the next 5 years.

-Although we have witnessed reduction in presence of partic-ulate matters in the air, the fact that the amount of NO2, SO2 and CO is increasing is not receiving the attention it deserves. A 2005 study conducted in India, New Delhi had proven that NO2, among the other six types of air pollut-ants identified by the WHO is the most harmful to human health. Yet, the amount of this pollutant in Ulaanbaatar has been kept at 2-3 times higher levels than previous years. You have served as UNICEF representative in India. What can Mongolia learn from the policies India implemented in terms of re-ducing NO2, SO2 and CO?


-The main sources of air pollution in India are different from Mongolia. In India, it is a combination of indus­try, traffic, burning of urban and ag­ricultural waste, and the use of solid fuels for cooking. In Mongolia, the air pollution is by far dominated by the burning of coal for heating. As a re­sult, PM2.5 is clearly the most harm­ful pollutant in the context of Mon­golia. I am however very concerned about the high number of carbon monoxide poisoning associated with the use of the refined coal (enhanced coal briquettes). This is particularly dangerous to pregnant women because it can deplete the fetus from oxygen which can affect the development of the fetus in many ways and can increase the risk of a miscarriage. It again highlights the urgency to stop burning coal indoors. We have to imagine the im­pact of air pollutions on every child.

-A Science and policy dialogue on combating urban air pollution impacts on maternal and child health in Asia recently conclud-ed successfully in Ulaanbaatar. What’s your take on the results of the forum?


-This dialogue brought together some of the world’s top scientists and policy makers from Mongolia and from across the region and the world. We learned that there is in-creasing evidence that air pollution affects fertility. On the positive side, there is also evidence that air purifiers, when correctly used, can contribute to better birth outcomes. Policymakers brought solutions and knowledge from their countries and discussed potential collaborations at the regional level. It was clear that the health sector needs to get much stronger involved. Mongolia shared with other countries what the health sector can do in terms of awareness raising and strength­ening health services for vulnera­ble children. The Ministry of Health with the support from the Ministry of Finance is providing pneumonia vaccines to children which makes them less sensitive to air pollution. Also, UNICEF and the Ministry of Health are rolling out a training programme on air pollution and maternal and child health, to fur-ther educate health practitioners.

-Child health depends on adults. Could you give examples of good experience from the workshops or seminars for adults to help raise their children healthy?


-Indeed, parents play a critical role in a child’s health and devel­opment. Parents should play with their children, read books with them and make sure they get healthy di­ets and their vaccinations on time. Мany governments and companies have already started to adopt family-friendly policies and proce-dures including paid maternal and parental leave, paid sick-leave, breastfeeding breaks, quality childcare and child benefits. Now we need commitment to implemen­tation. Family­friendly policies are not just the right thing to do, but also the smart and equitable thing to do for the economy and the society.

-What other things have you achieved other than attending the forum during your visit in Mongolia? How many high-lev-el meetings have you attended? Can we expect positive outcomes regarding child labor, children’s and maternal health following your visit?


-In all my conversations I high­lighted that this year the world is celebrating the 30th anniversary of the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Mongolia has made very good progress. There are more children surviving than ever before, there are more children in school than ever before. There are also unfin­ished business and emerging is­sues to address. I visited Kinder­garten #63 in Bayanzurkh District where UNICEF installed mechanical ventilation and air purification and GIZ improved the insulation of the building, financially supported by the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC). This kindergarten is now more energy efficient and has cleaner air inside, protect­ing children from air pollution. The teachers, children and parents were very happy. This should become standard practice in all kindergar­tens and UNICEF will continue to advocate for this. I had the hon­or to meet the Minister of Health Mrs D.Sarangerel. I truly appreciate her leadership and commitment to advance the air pollution related agenda in her capacity of Member of the Parliament. I also had the opportunity to facilitate a produc­tive meeting between UNICEF and the Governments of Mongolia and China to explore possible South­South Cooperation. We discussed potential concrete opportunities to collaborate in the field of air pollu­tion and maternal and child health, such as knowledge exchange, joint research and technology exchange. I also had a very good meeting with the Minister of Education Mr. Yo Baatarbileg. We agreed on the need to invest more in improving the quality of learning, improving water, sanitation and hygiene in kindergar­tens and schools, and addressing climate change. With support from our partners such as ChildFund Korea and KOICA, UNICEF will provide technical assistance on those issues and I expect good results moving forward.

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Bold: 30 percent of net profit will be distributed to shareholders as dividends

The company’s net profit reached MNT 2.6 billion in 2018 and MNT 2.9 billion in the third quarter of 2019

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Tumen Shuvuut JSC, listen on the Mongolian Stock Exchange (MSE), has recently presented its quarterly financial performance. Since its establishment in 2004, Tumen Shuvuut has been con-stantly expanding its operations in egg production and poultry farm-ing. The company launched its IPO on January 16. The Official Gazette sat down with Bold.J, Executive Director of Tumen Shuvuut JSC, to discuss about the IPO and the company’s financial performance.

Shall we start from the spending of the money raised in initial public offering?

-As of today, our company has invested about MNT 13 billion of which, MNT 10 billion has been raised from the IPO. The company also spent the money, including the MNT 3 billion from accumulated net income on four major projects. 

-According to the recent announcement, Tumen Shuvuut reported a 52 percent increase in net profit. How will the company benefit from the gain?­

The economic situation of Mongolia was relatively stable in 2019, reflecting on our company’s performance. The company’s net profit reached MNT 2.6 billion in 2018 and MNT 2.9 billion in the third quarter of 2019. We are aiming to increase this amount to MNT 4 billion by the end of 2019. The net income will be spent on improving the company’s production. In the framework of the Tumen Shuvuut­2 project, we’re planning to build factories to raise broiler chickens for harvesting meat and produce organic fertilizers. Also, 30 percen of the net profit will be distributed to shareholders as dividends after paying taxes. The shareholders will finalize the date in its annual meeting after the final financial performance is released. 

-Mongolia is now providing its domestic demands and reduced its reliance on importing eggs. What kind of changes has been seen in the market?

-According to a study, Mongolians consume 300 million eggs annually. It shows about 100 egg consumption for each person. However, its lower than the world average. Mongolia imports 50 percent of its egg consumption from Russia. We are working to improve domestic production, for an egg is a food  that should be used freshly. 

-A massive waste has been made, followed by the egg factory. What are the measures that the company is taking?­

We are using chicken manure as an organic fertilizer since it has a lot of advantages. We also use egg peel for animal feed.